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Blues
BLUE DEVILS
Exploring the ever evolving world of blues music.
JR Promotions
Promoting blues worldwide
A number of ragtime tunes were published in 1912. These included Memphis Blues, Baby Seals Blues and Dallas Blues. The term ‘blues’ denoted that these pieces were to be played at a slow pace. Indeed, the last one contained instructions for it to be played very slowly. Thus, a popular form of music was born. The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture: Vol. 12 tells us that ‘when popular blues began to be published in 1912… it was perceived as a new kind of ragtime tune with a novel 3-line verse form and the exotic element of blue notes. The use of blue notes…helped to loosen up the formalism of ragtime.’ Whilst ragtime had decreased in popularity by the 1920’s, songs accompanied by skilled ragtime guitarists continued to be well received into the 1930s. Amongst the key artists were Blind Blake, Blind Boy Fuller and Blind Lemon Jefferson. The number of blind musicians associated with this music, suggests the form was particularly suitable for street buskers. Presumably due in part, to the public familiarity with the original tunes.
© JR Promotions
1912 RAGTIME TO BLUES
Exploring the ever evolving world of blues music.
A number of ragtime tunes were published in 1912. These were Memphis Blues, Baby Seals Blues and Dallas Blues. The term ‘blues’ denoted that these pieces were to be played at a slow pace. Indeed, the last one contained instructions for it to be played very slowly. Thus, a popular form of music was born. The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture: Vol. 12 tells us that ‘when popular blues began to be published in 1912… it was perceived as a new kind of ragtime tune with a novel 3-line verse form and the exotic element of blue notes. The use of blue notes…helped to loosen up the formailism of ragtime.’ Whilst ragtime had decreased in popularity by the 1920’s, songs accompanied by skilled ragtime guitarists continued to be well received into the 1930s. Amongst the key artists were Blind Blake, Blind Boy Fuller and Blind Lemon Jefferson. The number of blind musicians associated with this music, suggests the form was particularly suitable for street buskers. Presumably due to the public awareness of the original tunes.
RAGTIME TO BLUES