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Blues
BLUE DEVILS
Exploring the ever evolving world of blues music.
JR Promotions
Promoting blues worldwide
At the end of the 19th Century America was still establishing its identity, as with so many nations coming together, it lacked any common traditions. Instead, it turned to Europe to provide a heritage. Many public buildings boasted neo-classical columns. The upper middle classes filled their houses with art from the European masters, whilst they enjoyed the music of its great composers. At the same time, vaudeville became a popular entertainment. Theatres were established for separate white and black audiences. Some welcomed anyone able to purchase a ticket. For each performance, a wide variety of entertainers appeared on the same bill. Each act provided about 20 minutes entertainment. Black-faced minstrels were a popular draw, with musicians applying black polish to their faces and performing ‘coon’ songs. In 1895, Ernest Hogan, a black entertainer wrote a piece of popular music entitled “All Coons Look Alike to Me”. This was based upon a song he heard in Chicago entitled ‘All Pimps Look Alike to Me.’ Hogan altered one word and syncopated the piece with a popular piece of ‘cakewalk’ style. Tom Fletcher, an African-American vaudeville entertainer stated that Hogan was the, “first to put on paper the kind of rhythm that was being played by non-reading musicians.” He called this new type of syncopated music ‘ragtime’, named after the ‘Shake Rag’ district where he was born.
© JR Promotions
1895 RAGTIME
Exploring the ever evolving world of blues music.
At the end of the 19th Century America was still establishing its identity, as with so many nations coming together, it lacked any common traditions. Instead, it turned to Europe to provide a heritage. Many public buildings boasted neo-classical columns. The upper middle classes filled their houses with art from the European masters, whilst they enjoyed the music of its great composers. At the same time, vaudeville became a popular entertainment. Theatres were established for separate white and black audiences. Some welcomed anyone able to purchase a ticket. For each performance, a wide variety of entertainers appeared on the same bill. Each act provided about 20 minutes entertainment. Black-faced minstrels were a popular draw, with musicians applying black polish to their faces and performing ‘coon’ songs. In 1895, Ernest Hogan, a black entertainer wrote a piece of popular music entitled “All Coons Look Alike to Me”. This was based upon a song he heard in Chicago entitled ‘All Pimps Look Alike to Me.’ Hogan altered one word and syncopated the piece with a popular piece of ‘cakewalk’ style. Tom Fletcher, an African-American vaudeville entertainer stated that Hogan was the, “first to put on paper the kind of rhythm that was being played by non- reading musicians.” He called this new type of syncopated music ‘ragtime’, named after the ‘Shake Rag’ district of Bowling Green, Kentucky where he was born.
RAGTIME