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Blues
BLUE DEVILS
Exploring the ever evolving world of blues music.
JR Promotions
Promoting blues worldwide
Taking its roots from blues, Appalachian and western folk music, hillbilly music was born in the southern United States. The first commercial recording featuring vocals and lyrics was Fiddlin' John Carson with "Little Log Cabin in the Lane". This was made for Okeh Records on June 14, 1923. The first nationwide hit of this music was "Wreck of the Old 97", made by Vernon Dalhart in May 1924. The flip side of the record was "Lonesome Road Blues", which also became very popular. Jimmie Rodgers fused hillbilly, gospel, jazz, blues, pop, cowboy, and folk music. Many of his most popular songs including "Blue Yodel" were self-penned. This title sold over a million records, establishing him as the premier singer of early country music. Working in medicine shows with the black songster Frank Stokes, his music spread to a wide audience. The technique of coupling blues with yodeling grew in popularity and was adopted by the Mississippi Sheiks on their “Yodeling Fiddling Blues.” Other white country musicians, including the dramatic fiddler Earl Johnson and the washboard player and vocalist Herschel Brown, included “blues” in their recorded items, at least using this term. By no means were their blues songs all of the three-line, twelve-bar blues form of the black singers and musicians, as at this time blues music was not clearly defined in terms of a particular chord progression. Not until the 1920s and 30s with the popularity of early performers such as Bessie Smith, did use of the twelve-bar blues spread across the music industry as more sophisticated Western harmonies were added . Many traditional seculars, whether ballads or minstrelsy, were identified as blues, as was the case with Earl Johnson’s “John Henry Blues” or Herschel Brown’s spoken “Talking Nigger Blues.” Talking blues had been innovated by Chris Bouchillon, and several country singers used the idiom. The term ‘country’ became favoured rather than ‘hillbilly music’ in the 1940s. Despite this preference a number of musicians still use this term, or variations of it. Notable amongst these are the north-east band, The Heavenly Thrillbillies.
© JR Promotions
1923 COUNTRY MEETS BLUES
Exploring the ever evolving world of blues music.
Taking its roots from blues, Appalachian and western folk music, hillbilly music was born in the southern United States. The first commercial recording featuring vocals and lyrics was Fiddlin' John Carson with "Little Log Cabin in the Lane". This was made for Okeh Records on June 14, 1923. The first nationwide hit of this music was "Wreck of the Old 97", made by Vernon Dalhart in May 1924. The flip side of the record was "Lonesome Road Blues", which also became very popular. Jimmie Rodgers fused hillbilly, gospel, jazz, blues, pop, cowboy, and folk music. Many of his most popular songs including "Blue Yodel" were self-penned. This title sold over a million records, establishing him as the premier singer of early country music. Working in medicine shows with the black songster Frank Stokes, his music spread to a wide audience. The technique of coupling blues with yodeling grew in popularity and was adopted by the Mississippi Sheiks on their “Yodeling Fiddling Blues.” Other white country musicians, including the dramatic fiddler Earl Johnson and the washboard player and vocalist Herschel Brown, included “blues” in their recorded items, at least using this term. By no means were their blues songs all of the three-line, twelve-bar blues form of the black singers and musicians, as at this time blues music was not clearly defined in terms of a particular chord progression. Not until the 1920s and 30s with the popularity of early performers such as Bessie Smith, did use of the twelve-bar blues spread across the music industry as more sophisticated Western harmonies were added . Many traditional seculars, whether ballads or minstrelsy, were identified as blues, as was the case with Earl Johnson’s “John Henry Blues” or Herschel Brown’s spoken “Talking Nigger Blues.” Talking blues had been innovated by Chris Bouchillon, and several country singers used the idiom. The term ‘country’ became favoured rather than ‘hillbilly music’ in the 1940s. Despite this preference a number of musicians still use this term, or variations of it. Notable amongst these are the north-east band, The Heavenly Thrillbillies.
1923 COUNTRY MEETS BLUES